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For several years we have been blessed to be an overseas clinical site for nursing students at Johns Hopkins School of Nursing taking their Public Health Nursing course as undergraduate BSN students.  Twice each year we have had a group of 9 students and one faculty member come down to Haiti to work with us in our Water and Sanitation Program as well as assist with patient consultations in our outpatient clinic in Gatineau.  Over the years, these students and their incredibly dedicated faculty have helped us train our Community Promoters, train our census workers, evaluate our water and sanitation program, provide community education in communities far from the clinic and work beside us in giving medical and nursing care in our clinic.  They have had a huge role to play in the success of our community development efforts and we are grateful for the ongoing relationship we have had with the School of Nursing.

As with most things in life, things change and Johns Hopkins School of Nursing has decided to make their nursing program a masters level program now, doing away with the Public Health Nursing course.  But, thanks to faculty member Diana Baptiste and Johns Hopkins School of Public Health faculty member Pablo Yori, we have now entered into a new relationship with both the School of Nursing and the School of Public Health (which is where I obtained my MPH degree).  Diana and Pablo and graduate student Sabianca Delva joined Dr. Nicole Warren and her last group of undergraduate nursing students on a visit to us in early May.  Nicole and her students led a training session for 12 new Community Promoters, helped us out in the clinic with patient care and education and visited a far away community to conduct a community education session with the community members.

New community promoters work together on an assignment during their training session

New community promoters work together on an assignment during their training session

Promoters learn how to construct a tippy-tap as a means of washing hands

Promoters learn how to construct a tippy-tap as a means of washing hands

Promoters take a test on the last day of class.

Promoters take a test on the last day of class.

12 new community promoters with Gemi, Dr. Wolf and instructors

12 new community promoters with Gemi, Dr. Wolf and instructors

JHSON team on the residence porch.  Standing:  Michelle, Melissa, Ellie, Leah, Colleen.  Squatting:  Julia, Suzie, Augusta, Abi and faculty member Dr. Nicole Warren.

JHSON team on the residence porch. Standing: Michelle, Melissa, Ellie, Leah, Colleen. Squatting: Julia, Suzie, Augusta, Abi and faculty member Dr. Nicole Warren.

Diana, Pablo and Sabi visited several water sources in the area and observed how the local people obtain, transport and store their water.  In addition, they saw some of the new latrines that have just been constructed in our Promoter communities and assisted the students in their community education activities.  Pablo has been working in the field of water and sanitation for many years in Peru and we were thrilled to be able to have him observe and give feedback on our own community development efforts.  Both Diana and Sabi are Haitian-Americans and speak Creole fluently, so they were a huge help during the community visits.  We all spent some time discussing together the future of our partnership with Johns Hopkins and possible areas of collaboration.  Some of those areas may involve doing clinical research, providing opportunities for graduate students to get some field experience and multi-disciplinary assistance with our water and sanitation program.  We look forward to what lies in store for all of us!

 The team, including Pablo, hike to a far away community of Milfort to visit two new promoters and conduct a community education session.

The team, including Pablo, hike to a far away community of Milfort to visit two new promoters and conduct a community education session.

Faculty member Diana Baptiste, showing off her new FHH t-shirt (available through the FHH store on our website!)

Faculty member Diana Baptiste, showing off her new FHH t-shirt (available through the FHH store on our website!)

The entire team on their last day in Jeremie (Top from left:  Diana, Pablo, Julia, Melissa, Nicole, Sabi, Abi, Leah, Augusta)  (Sitting from left:  Suzie, Coleen, Michelle, Ellie)

The entire team on their last day in Jeremie (Top from left: Diana, Pablo, Julia, Melissa, Nicole, Sabi, Abi, Leah, Augusta) (Sitting from left: Suzie, Coleen, Michelle, Ellie)

As you all know, Saturday night was the night when clocks changed for Daylight Savings Time in the US. For the past four years in Haiti, the time changed as well. So, we thought this year would be no different. On Saturday morning I drove a group of visitors into Port-au-Prince and took them to the airport. Another two visitors were due to arrive in PAP at 4pm and we were going to pick them up from Matthew 25 guesthouse the next morning and head on out to Jérémie. I didn’t want to forget about the time change, so before I went to bed, I changed my watch to the new time. I had a twinge of doubt about the time changing in Haiti this year because I hadn’t heard anyone talking about it. But, I never listen to the Haitian radio, so I figured it was just because I wasn’t paying attention to any local news.

Sure enough, when I woke up at 6:30am (the “old” 5:30am) on Sunday morning, my cell phone, which has a Haiti SIM card in it, read “6:30am”, indicating to me that Haiti had, indeed changed to Daylight Savings Time.

I had told our visitors we would be at Matthew 25 between 7:30 and 8:00am and we arrived at 8:10am (the “new” time). Our visitors, Dr. Greg VonRoenn and Dr. Dan Tanty were ready and waiting for us. As we drove out to Jérémie, we discussed the time change. Things were apparently quite confused at Matthew 25 as no one really knew the correct time here in Haiti. But, I was quite confident that the time had changed because my cell phone told me so!

Bright and early Monday morning, we all got up before dawn in the dark because the inverter had crashed around 5am. Taking showers by flashlight is quite routine here, as is making breakfast with the use of a headlamp. As we sat down to eat in the dark, we all thought, “This time change is ridiculous! Who wants to get up before the sun does?” We drove through town and stopped at our regular place where we pick up the Haitian nurse who works for us. But, she wasn’t there. “Oh well,” I said. “She must not be aware of the time change.” So, I called her and said “The time has changed.” Her response was one of surprise but she said she’d be down quickly to meet us and ten minutes later we were on our way. “The time has changed,” I said again. “Didn’t they tell you that in church yesterday?” I was a little surprised when she said there was no announcement about it and no one seemed confused. So, as we were driving I said to Greg VonRoenn, “You know, if we could check the internet, maybe we can find out for sure if the time has changed.” So, of course, he had his trusty cell phone in hand, checked the internet and, sure enough, it said the time in PAP was the new Daylight Savings Time. “So there, “ I thought. “We are right.” On our way up to the clinic, Cherlie called Guy-Johns, our pharmacy technician who opens the clinic each day. “The time has changed. Did you know that?” “No,” he said, laughing. “I had no idea.” So, he quickly got dressed and was there at work with Adrien, our registration clerk and chaplain, when we arrived. “The time has changed, the time has changed,” I shouted out, feeling like Chicken Little telling everyone the sky was falling! We told the patients, we told our employees, we told our translators. “How come no one else knew?” we wondered.

We went through the day, working hard seeing 64 patients and finally in the afternoon, I happened to check my emails. There was an email from MAF, a missionary aviation service here in Haiti, advising all of its upcoming passengers that “Haiti did not change to Daylight Savings Time”. Oh my goodness. How could the cell phone be wrong? How could the internet be wrong? Is the sky really falling? We had quite a laugh over it, rejoicing all the while because it means that we no longer have to get up in the dark in the morning! Hooray! So, if you’re planning on flying to Haiti any time in the near future, be sure to check your flight times. It will hopefully avoid some confusion!

 

We were blessed recently to have a visit from a group of friends from Milwaukee that included Ray and Donna Moon, Bob Chase, Yvonne DuCharme, Lawrence DuCharme, Brittany DuCharme and Dr. Ron Schroeder. They served with us for two weeks and did they work hard! We had asked that they come down to build cabinets for our laboratory and pharmacy and they accomplished this in splendid fashion under the expert eye of Bob Chase and with the assistance of Lawrence DuCharme and the rest of the team. Even Dr. Ron was put to work helping out after seeing patients with Dr. Wolf in the clinic.

Master cabinetmaker Bob Chase (left) and Lawrence DuCharme directed the team

Master cabinetmaker Bob Chase (left) and Lawrence DuCharme directed the team

Brittany (Lawrence and Yvonne’s niece) and Donna staining the cabinets on the pharmacy sidewalk

Brittany (Lawrence and Yvonne’s niece) and Donna staining the cabinets on the pharmacy sidewalk

Beginning of the installation of cabinets in the laboratory

Beginning of the installation of cabinets in the laboratory

Lab cabinets installed

Lab cabinets installed

In addition to making and installing the cabinets in the laboratory and pharmacy, the team painted and organized the electrical and plumbing rooms.

The women did most of the painting of the electrical and plumbing rooms, cleaning and organizing them as well.

The women did most of the painting of the electrical and plumbing rooms, cleaning and organizing them as well.

They also emptied out drums of clinic and laboratory supplies and organized them in the clinic and laboratory storerooms.

Boxes of laboratory and clinic supplies organized in the laboratory storeroom

Boxes of laboratory and clinic supplies organized in the laboratory storeroom

This team was the first of our visiting groups to stay overnight in our new second floor residence quarters. Once the iron doors and windows were installed in the residence to secure the building, we felt that it was safe enough for our visitors to stay up there during the week. This enabled them to start work earlier, finish later and avoid the fatigue of the drive up and down the mountain each day. We had two full beds and several cots up there with extra mattresses, linens and towels, canned foods, juice, milk and other staples, dishes, silverware, pots and pans and kitchen utensils. The team fixed their own food each day and seemed to enjoy their independence and the cool mountain breezes! Cherlie and I went back to our house in Jérémie each day to re-stock our clinic meds and check on the house and our dogs!

Dining room and kitchen of the residence

Dining room and kitchen of the residence

Donna, Ray, Bob, Brittany and Lawrence enjoying lunch up at the residence

Donna, Ray, Bob, Brittany and Lawrence enjoying lunch up at the residence

Engineers Lawrence and Brittany rigged up frames over their cots for mosquito nets.

Engineers Lawrence and Brittany rigged up frames over their cots for mosquito nets.

In addition to all of their other work, Bob decided that they should construct bunk beds for the residence bedrooms. So, after working several days on the design, the group set to work cutting and varnishing the pieces, after which they installed 4 bunk bed sets. Of course, they made sure they slept in them before they left the site!

All the plywood bunk bed parts lined up and ready to be installed

All the plywood bunk bed parts lined up and ready to be installed

It took a team to install the beds (Ray, Ron and Yvonne)

It took a team to install the beds (Ray, Ron and Yvonne)

Bunkbeds after installation in the bedrooms of the residence

Bunkbeds after installation in the bedrooms of the residence

While the construction team was working hard, Dr. Ron Schroeder was helping us see patients in our clinic. As a gynecologist, he offered specialty services to our patients that were very much appreciated and he performed almost 90 Pap smears during the two weeks he was here. He was a huge help to us and to our patients.

Dr. Ron consulting with a patient in our clinic

Dr. Ron consulting with a patient in our clinic

During the time the team was here, there were two situations that clearly showed us that people were praying for them in their service with us here in Haiti.

The first situation occurred late one afternoon after Cherlie and I had left to go back to Jérémie. As Ray was finishing work in the work shop, he accidentally cut his arm on the miter saw. Fortunately, the whole team mobilized and found instruments, suture material, gauze and gloves for Dr. Ron to use to suture the laceration. Ray was a good patient and was quickly patched up and ready to work again the next day!

Dr. Ron putting sutures in Ray’s arm laceration outside the clinic. Natural light is a wonderful thing!

Dr. Ron putting sutures in Ray’s arm laceration outside the clinic. Natural light is a wonderful thing!

Ray and Donna Moon, team organizers, take a little break from their work

Ray and Donna Moon, team organizers, take a little break from their work

The second situation that showed us God’s wonderful grace happened on Friday, January 29th, when the group was returning to Port au Prince (PAP) to fly out the following day to the US. During that week, there had been a lot of violence in PAP and the rural areas as a result of the cancelled Presidential runoff elections on January 24th. We were apprehensive about the political instability and considered several options in trying to get our visitors to PAP safely and on to their families in the US. We decided that we would have them go to PAP in our large jeep with Miller, our driver and Cherlie to accompany them in case of any demonstrations or problems on the road. They left Jérémie at 3am and were making wonderful progress when, an hour outside of PAP, a vehicle pulled out suddenly in front of the jeep and the vehicles collided in a noisy crash. Due to the grace of God, no one was seriously injured in either vehicle, although our jeep sustained major damage to the front end. If it wasn’t for a large iron bumper that we had installed when we first purchased the jeep, the damage and injuries could have been more significant. We are dismayed by the damaged jeep but praise the Lord for his protection of the passengers and driver. They were picked up by the guesthouse driver and made it back to the US without further problems and Cherlie came back to Jérémie on a bus. The jeep will stay in PAP until it gets repaired.

POLITICAL INSTABILITY

We appreciate your prayers for the political situation here in Haiti which is very unstable at this time. President Martelly is due to step down from power on February 7th and there is no duly elected president to take over from him. There is talk about a transitional government being set up but this has not yet been done. Every day there have been demonstrations in PAP and sometimes they have spread into the rural towns outside the capital. We have had to cancel visitors for February due to the instability and hope that the situation calms down so we can continue on with our normal activities and trips back and forth to Port au Prince in the near future.

Whenever we have visitors here in Haiti, Cherlie and I try to be creative in designing activities for them that use their skills and gifts and also enhance our ministry here. Since we are in a development stage as an organization, we sometimes use our visitors to “test the waters” for us, asking them to plan and implement activities in the local communities and churches around us in order to see how they are received and whether they meet their stated goals and objectives. January 2 – 9 we were blessed to have a wonderful multigenerational group from Eastbrook Church in Milwaukee here to test some waters with us!

The group consisted of the Riebe family – Katherine and Alan and their teenage son Joshua and daughter Charis, Geri Koterman and her grandson Josiah, Michael Borst and his daughter Natalie, college student Betsy Boggs and Leona Bush. Everyone in the group spent some time observing and helping in the clinic, packing medications and helping to distribute toys and clothing to our pediatric patients. On Monday and Tuesday the group worked with various age groups in a young Protestant church that is being pastored by our clinic chaplain Adrien Jean Jacques. The church is located a short walk up the mountain from the clinic and many of the church members are our patients.

In the morning, the young people and Mike and Alan held a soccer clinic with the church youth, leading them in a devotional and then doing soccer drills and playing games in such a way as to foster team work. They also played a game of “ultimate Frisbee” with the Haitian children and discovered that they were quick learners.

Natalie, Charis and Mike sitting with some of the soccer participants

Natalie, Charis and Mike sitting with some of the soccer participants

At the same time, Geri and Leona were leading the adult members of the church in a Bible Study lesson on Ruth and Naomi, having the Haitian church members share their interpretation of the Bible lesson with everyone. It was a great time of interaction and learning from both sides.

Geri and Leona acting out the story of Ruth and Naomi for the church members

Geri and Leona acting out the story of Ruth and Naomi for the church members

Then, in the afternoon, the group held a Vacation Bible School (VBS) session with the children from the church, sharing a Bible story with them, doing crafts and playing games. The children were enthusiastic participants and loved the attention they got from the American youth.

Natalie, Charis, Josiah and Joshua enjoying their new Haitian friends

Natalie, Charis, Josiah and Joshua enjoying their new Haitian friends

The Eastbrook team leads the VBSers in an animated song

The Eastbrook team leads the VBSers in an animated song

Children attending one of the VBS sessions

Children attending one of the VBS sessions

Two of the boys comparing one another’s artwork during craft time

Two of the boys comparing one another’s artwork during craft time

Charis, Betsy and Natalie take a selfie with some of the VBS attendees

Charis, Betsy and Natalie take a selfie with some of the VBS attendees

On Wednesday and Thursday, the group did similar activities at a small Baptist church down the mountain from the clinic. This is Gemi’s (our Community Coordinator) home church and is led by a Haitian lay pastor. He and the church members were thrilled to have the visitors participate with them and they also had very lively discussions.

 highlight of Leona’s afternoon was “babysitting” for this little boy who attended the VBS session with his older brother.

highlight of Leona’s afternoon was “babysitting” for this little boy who attended the VBS session with his older brother.

Geri stands with the lay pastor of the Duchene church and his wife

Geri stands with the lay pastor of the Duchene church and his wife

The little Baptist church in Duchene – one of many churches in need of our encouragement and support

The little Baptist church in Duchene – one of many churches in need of our encouragement and support

We’re grateful for teams like the Eastbrook Church team who are able to minister to community members and support local churches on our behalf. They brought their skills and the warmth of their personalities to bear witness to the Spirit of Christ within them and their fellowship with Haitian believers was very much appreciated. We thank them for their encouragement and support and pray for them to return again in the future.

NECESSITY IS THE MOTHER OF INVENTION

I’ve always heard it said that “necessity is the mother of invention” but I didn’t realize how true it is until this past week. We have been having a severe water shortage at our house in Jeremie and each time we have visitors, we wonder if we’ll have enough water for us to wash all the sheets and towels after their visits. Last week we were feeling a little stressed when we realized we had ten sets of sheets from our visitors from Eastbrook and five sets from the Avera group in December that needed washing and we had no water in our cistern under Cherlie’s closet. How were we to prepare beds for the seven visitors coming in over the weekend? We didn’t have enough spare sheets and now we had no water to wash the dirty ones. A dilemma! Typical of life in Haiti.

Well, we just happened to have an automatic washing machine that we had sent down to Haiti a few months ago with the intention of using it up at the residence quarters once we started living up there. It was sitting on our porch and hadn’t yet been used. So, we decided to take it up to the site and with the use of a generator that was already up there, we got water out of the cistern under the sidewalk of the pharmacy building using buckets and filled the washer with it. The water is rain water collected off the roof of the clinic. So, once we got everything set up, Cherlie proceeded to wash five sets of sheets while clinic was going on. She put up a clothesline under the trees in front of the clinic and by the time I had finished seeing all the patients, our sheets were washed and dried and ready to be folded up and taken home! Water is plentiful up at the clinic and we discovered a new use for it to help us deal with a difficult problem at home. We’re grateful that we have options to consider in dealing with the necessities of life here!

Due to my perfectionist tendencies, I’m not a very good blogger. It’s because I want to be sure that anything I write is well-written and says something significant. I realize those are not really priorities in the social networking realm, but it’s hard to break from well-established habits! In this blog, however, I am going to attempt to be a bit mundane and share with you some photos of our newest batch of puppies! We have a prolific female dog that is a typical Haitian “mutt” but she is a very good mother and is very fertile, having had numerous litters of puppies over the years, most of which we’ve given away. Recently, however, we kept her in the yard with our half-German Shepherd male, Smokey, hoping that nature would take its course and they would mate. Well, 6 weeks ago, she birthed 3 male and 2 female puppies and we think they definitely have some Smokey tendencies! Below are photos of the cute little things, all of whom we think we’ll have to keep!

 Here is a tired-looking mama nursing all 5 of her babies at once. And some of you thought twins were hard!

Here is a tired-looking mama nursing all 5 of her babies at once. And some of you thought twins were hard!

Puppies_closeup

Each one finds the perfect position

All three boys are cream-colored, as is one of the females

All three boys are cream-colored, as is one of the females

The one black baby is a female who looks just like her daddy!

The one black baby is a female who looks just like her daddy!

 

All of us at Friends for Health in Haiti would like to wish you a very Happy Easter weekend. In Haiti, Easter weekend is a time to eat special foods (eggs, cassava bread, cabbage made from palm hearts, beets, fish, etc.) and attend special church services celebrating the resurrection of Christ. This weekend we share with other Christians the joy of knowing that our Lord conquered death and gives us hope for redemption and renewal in our lives.

Cherlie and I will be traveling this weekend, on our way to the US for a few weeks of fund-raising activities, meetings and family visits. We will be in NJ and NY first, touching base with family members and supporting churches. Then, in the middle of the month we’re heading out to Milwaukee in order to be there for the 7th annual FHH fund-raising banquet which is being held on April 25th at the Wisconsin Club. We hope that many of you will be able to attend this fun event.

We appreciate your prayers for us as we travel and for success for the Milwaukee banquet and our board meeting the following day. We hope to see many of you and look forward to saying “thanks” for your faithful support and encouragement to us in our ministry here in Haiti.

Today, January 12, 2015 marks the five year anniversary of the devastating earthquake that occurred in Port-au-Prince, leaving thousands dead, more wounded and millions without homes. Since that day, millions of dollars have come into the country in the form of aid, most of it to provide relief for the immediate needs of the population after the earthquake. Rebuilding has occurred in some areas of the country but thousands of people still live in tents or plywood shelters, rather than permanent concrete homes. The appearance of cholera several months after the earthquake only worsened the health status of the people and the epidemic persists, largely due to a lack of clean water and improved sanitation, especially in rural areas. Despite the devastation in Port-au-Prince, people’s lives have continued relatively unchanged. They set up their wares to sell by the side of the streets on top of the rubble, rather than on the sidewalk. Their houses are now covered with tin and tarps, rather than concrete, the kind that came crashing down on unsuspecting victims on that fateful day. Colorful tap-taps continue to provide them with local transportation and banks, offices and businesses are filled with clients clamoring for their services.

Haiti is changed, but unchanged. No one’s life was unaffected by the events of that day five years ago. But, lives have gone on, some for better, some for worse. The rich have gotten richer in the re-building efforts, but the poor seem to have gotten poorer as very little aid has trickled down to them. This is Haiti as it always has been – the very rich and the very poor, with very little in between. These are the people we at Friends for Health in Haiti are here to serve and we count it a privilege to live among them and to share in their struggles with them.

I encourage you to take a moment today to reflect, not on the tragedy that occurred that day five years ago, but on the resilience of the Haitian people, their patience and persistence in the face of insurmountable problems and their faith and belief in the God who created them.

In early November, 2014 the FHH Board of Directors held their board meeting in Haiti for the first time, instead of their usual meeting location in Pewaukee, Wisconsin.  Several board members have visited the clinic previously, in various stages of construction, and some were there for the first time.  Here is the first guest blog post by our visiting board members.

Tom Mahn, MD

Tom Mahn, MD

I recently visited Haiti to see Katie Wolf MD and Cherlie Severe who are Christian medical missionaries in Gatineau. I met Katie many years ago when she was working as a physician at St. Joes. Now she is a full time medical missionary along with Cherlie, an RN who also worked at St. Joes. Cherlie is from Jeremie, Haiti which is down the mountain from the clinic in Gatineau. Several years ago when I visited, they were seeing patients two days a week in a tin roof hut. Now there are beautiful buildings there including a clinic, pharmacy, storage depot, and residence. Plans are underway at some point for an inpatient unit and women’s health center among other things. There is a community outreach program that has included water, hygiene, and seed program. Last week a visiting group even did regional animal vaccines!

The road from Jeremie (where they live) to Gatineau is like nothing you have ever ridden on. The 10 mile trip takes 1 ½ hours each way. They go through tires like crazy. When the residence is finished they (and visiting teams) will be able to stay at the clinic during the week which will be a big help.

Katie and Cherlie are full time in Haiti. There are three Haitian part-time employees: a chaplain, community outreach coordinator, and clinic/pharmacy administrator. This is a locally sustainable clinic that has become the pride of the local people. Patients are charged a little for visits and medications, though no one is turned away for financial reasons. People come dressed to the nines and walk up to four hours to get there.

I am on the board of this organization: Friends for Health in Haiti. If you want to know more or contribute, let me know, visit our website: www.friendsforhealthinhaiti.org, or best of all – come to our fund raising banquet April 25. FHH has done a lot to get the clinic to this point but there is a lot more that can be done.

-Tom Mahn, MD

Primary school teacher Jean Flobert Marcellus

Primary school teacher Jean Flobert Marcellus

Jean Flobert Marcellus is a patient of ours. He’s also a Haitian government-certified school teacher, assigned to teach in a school that is about a six hour walk into the mountains after you reach the end of the road! The locality where the school is located is called Lopino and it is one of the most isolated communities in our part of the country. Jean Flobert is 30 years old, with no wife or children yet and he’s a dedicated Christian. He’s been teaching in the school for a couple of years and spent most of our consultation time talking about the severe poverty, lack of development and challenges he faces in the community. He teaches in the government primary school in Lopino and is supposed to be making a fairly good salary. But, the government doesn’t pay teachers’ salaries regularly and he went all of last year without getting paid. I asked him why he continues to teach if he doesn’t get paid. He shrugged his shoulders and said, “It’s what I’ve been trained to do – teach. And, the children really need it.” He went on to tell me that he and several other teachers live in rooms they rent in local people’s houses, but they have no beds and no means of transporting them up into the mountains. So, he sleeps on a mat on the floor. His students’ parents often yell at him and the other teachers, claiming that they’re brainwashing the children, stealing the parents’ money and taking the children away from working in the fields.

As I listened to Jean Flobert’s story, I thought about the fact that his work is like that of a missionary – sharing the truth, living out one’s faith, making sacrifices for something that is for the good of others, only they often don’t see it or appreciate it. As we’re reminded in Luke 9:23 “If anyone would come after me, he must deny himself and take up his cross daily and follow me.” Cherlie and I feel privileged to bear the cross of Christ in this country and we are blessed to be joined in our sacrifice by Haitians like Jean Flobert, a young man who is trying to make a difference in the lives of the young people he teaches.

By Dr. Katie Wolf

A few months ago, Cherlie and I accompanied some visiting nursing students to the local Gatineau public school for a day of school screening exams.  We weighed and measured the height of each child, checked their blood pressure, listened to their hearts, gave them worm medicine and a month’s supply of multiple vitamins.  We also included the school teachers and they, along with the principal of the school, were thrilled.  It was our way of affirming and supporting public schools in our area and is something we hope to continue in the future.

Cherlie - School Screening

Cherlie – School Screening

Katie - School Screening

Katie – School Screening

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